Getting to THEIR Optimum Vision

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Are you a follower of the posts of Jesse Lyn Stoner? She is a business advisor and coach – as well as a bestselling author. I am a very dedicated follower. Her business leadership posts are quite often easily (and importantly) adapted to education; and her posts and quotations (such as the one in the featured image) are very aligned with my values and those of many others.

When I encountered this image on Twitter, I was, as usual, very much in agreement with its message. In fact, I added a comment: “Even worse are the people who don’t discuss issues with ANYONE… They simply select someone’s points of view as theirs!!!”

The title of my blog, “Considerations,” relates to my strongly held beliefs. It is our responsibility to ourselves, our country, and to humankind that we gather a broad body of information believed relevant to a topic of current importance. Subsequently, we must understand, assess for relevance, and organize into a Vision associated with the topic. ‘Vision’ is my term for the interrelationships/ linkages on the topic that enable us to deal appropriately and usefully with situations associated with the topic. ‘Appropriately and usefully’ is an extremely key phrase… One important use of our vision is discussions on the topic with others. While habitual dedication to ‘Considering’ will help us become better with the process, it would be frightening (to me at least) to allow ourselves to believe that personal vision is totally, automatically useful. (It’s no more automatically useful than the visions or points of view of anyone else.) Consistent with the quotation in the featured image above, discussions with a diverse group of people will indeed provide their assessment of and feedback to your vision and introduction to their vision – both improving the visions AND thus the outcomes for situations appropriate for application of those visions.

So how do people develop the skills of Consideration leading to these visions? For sure, each of us can and likely will self-develop the skills if we in fact seek to make a difference; we will self-assess our efforts during and after the application to identify and subsequently refine those skills. And, yes, our parents and family are hopefully successful in their efforts; and if so, they are likely to provide feedback and encouragement to us to refine our skills – starting at a young age.

It is my firm belief that formal education’s most important task is to facilitate the development of those skills. The four skills most critical, I believe, are Effective Learning, problem solving, communicating, and working in groups. Effective Learning deals with the gathering, understanding, and organizing information for use in developing a vision. [Aside: This Effective Learning will also prepare students for in-school assessment including the useless (IMHO) Standardized tests.]

Problem solving starts with recognition of a problem, continues with determination of the true objective, includes the building of aligned visions, obviously involves application of those visions to develop outcomes useful to addressing the objective, and ends with reflection on and documentation of outcomes and efforts made. Application of problem solving enhances both Effective Learning and formal School assessment by the way.

Communicating is important to our improved vision building as noted earlier; it is also obviously the route to our sharing of our efforts with others. I often remarked to my students that “It would be sad if our Nobel-prize efforts never were seen by others.” Of course, the likelihood of ‘Nobel-prize efforts’ are slim. But hopefully our efforts are valuable / useful to others for their adaptation and refinement. Those efforts will be so only if our preparation of material for clear communicating occurs – the complete skill of communicating.

Finally, there is the skill of working in groups. Very often, our efforts are a part of a formalized group effort; but even ‘individuals’ work in informal groups. An artist, for example, works with their manager, agent, materials suppliers, reviewers, gallery people, … Developing the skill of working in groups is important (including for working in study and project groups in school) and must be included in education priorities.

So there is my thesis on the preparation for successful formal education, for lifelong learning so important to a successful personal life and career, and for the critical exercise of our citizen responsibilities. If we educators facilitate the development of these skills and help them to become habitually used through student-centered addressing of our carefully developed driving questions, we will help our students understand the importance of getting to their optimum visions and doing so through discussions with people having diverse views.

“Business” or “Busyness” of Life

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I’m starting to read Amy Blankson’s book, “The Future of Happiness.” (From what I’ve learned from the press associated with the book and author, I’m quite certain I’ll be posting blog(s) related to this book in the near future.) In the Foreword to the book, her author / brother, Shawn Achor, writes: “Amy has her fingers on the pulse of what YOU can do in the midst of the busyness of life to harness technology to serve our true needs: social connection, meaning, and well-being.” This was the first time that I had seen the ‘busyness of life’ – and, for me, led immediately to the conparison found  in the title of this post.

That quote of Shawn Achor also triggered my seeming recollection of related writing of a favorite author of mine, the late Stephen Covey. Sure enough, looking through the Covey pages of Brainy Quotes (a great source by the way if you haven’t checked it out), my recollection was validated via the quote found in the featured photo above, referring again to life.

The two quotes I truly believe are so very compatible to each of our lives – including a critically important portion, education / learning. I totally reject and rebel against Considering education a business; it’s not!!! But because ‘busyness’ is so close to ‘business’ in the dictionary, the title of this post is acceptable to me – with business being associated with the “change, choice, and principles of Covey!

True for any activity as noted but limiting this blog post to learning, there are far too many politicians, policy people, citizens, and – yes, sadly – educators that either somehow believe strongly in (or just can’t see ‘the forest for the trees’ in getting overwhelmed with) the ‘busyness’ of education instead of the facilitation of Effective Learning. Front and center as Exhibit #1 has to be Standardized Testing!!! And I would add memorizing facts, exams, most homework, grading, … The ‘busyness’ of education that can only be defended with the comment “That’s how we’ve always done it” is robbing our students of the preparation for a satisfying / rewarding career and personal life.

So here’s my proposal: Let’s all agree to work together to make a list of the efforts currently being facilitated in education and the efforts that are being proposed for facilitating learning in education as well as efforts that we ourselves might propose for facilitating learning in education. Next, let’s include our students, parents, and interested community members in a determination of the school culture. Then, let’s assess out full list of efforts with regard to both school culture and the “change, choice, and principles” (most importantly principles) of Covey to develop a general local school approach to Effective Learning. I’m absolutely convinced, minimizing the busyness will provide more than sufficient time to implement this general approach.

But then it’s not straight to the classroom… First, we educators need to engage with our PLCs and PLNs to become more prepared to bring this general approach to each classroom. Next, each teacher needs to Consider the tweaks necessary for each student; one general approach will never be optimal for every student in the classroom. Finally, the facilitation of learning begins – with ongoing assessment and refinement of approach since planning / preparation can never be perfect!

That’s my thoughts with eliminating the busyness of education in order to facilitate Effective Learning. I’d love to learn your thoughts!!!

A Highly Anticipated Twitter Chat

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I participate regularly in Twitter chats, including #OklaEd, #VAChat, and #TWOTCW among others. The last one, #TWOTCW,  is moderated by Steve Wyborney in conjunction with his latest book “The Writing on the Classroom Wall.” The featured image above, in fact, is Question 1 from the #TWOTCW chat of April 18, 2017 (tonight as I work on this post).

As with many of Steve’s questions, this one featured really grabbed me: ‘Create a list of eight words that describe students.’ Asking for a list has occurred in his previous chats and generates two types of responses – a list of eight individual words or a phrase involving eight words. My reply usually is of the latter type but I cannot tell you why… Providing the questions early is a good one in my thinking, enabling chat participants to Consider their replies. Indeed, my post would have been something like “Exactly what their early environment enabled their becoming” – as noted, a phrase… But the subsequent questions by Steve reveal he’s seeking eight individual words such as the one I’ll likely post in a short while: “unique, culturally dependent, engaged or not, skilled learner / not.” Yes, I know – mostly shorter phrases.

But these are critical characteristics for students and their learning, I believe; and ones that I at least don’t know might have single-word replacements. And, yes, I even had to change ‘or’ to ‘/’ to get eight and not nine words… I’ll not discuss this list further here; but a recent blog post might provide more insight into my reasoning. Also, I had already made a note to develop another blog post on this topic. Stay tuned if you’re interested.

The real point I hope that I’ve illustrated with this particular post is that participating in Twitter chats does enable / encourage the level of Consideration of a topic that leads to Effective Learning. My experience with chats suggests that there are almost always one or more such questions that spark further Consideration / Effective Learning. Yes, having the questions ahead of time maybe contributes to richer participation; but having one’s tweets enables Consideration after the chat. Storify files are even better!

I hope you find this latest post of mine of value. Thanks for your reading it; feedback is always valued.

 

Words Are Not Adequate

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Let me paint my circumstances: We are still arranging our furniture and ‘goodies’ in our newly-built home – so exciting of course but still time consuming – five months later. We had a mandatory trip back to New England for some unavoidable appointments (and some great socializing with friends). And, finally, as with any moves, there are required effforts to both in dropping licenses, voter registrations, … at the previous location and adding the same at our new location.

And of course, George Couros chose the past five plus weeks to facilitate the second edition of his online Innovator’s Mindset MOOC! Having gained so very much personally from the first offering, I really didn’t want to miss this second offering. I made the commitment to actively participate – in the weekly live YouTube sessions, the book re-reading (in my case), the Wednesday night #IMMOOC Twitter chats, and individual assignments. This blog post in fact fulfills the last individual assignment.

To say that I’m so glad that I made the commitment to actively participate cannot be overstated… While I gained much knowledge, experience, links, contacts, and confidence from participation in the first offering, I can honestly report that the most valuable outcome, I now understand, was preparation for the second offering. But then, those of us dedicated to lifelong Effective Learning know it to be critical to happiness / success (regardless of our definitions of both). Perfection is a useful if unattainable goal but continued attention to it will always be of great value. Yes, things change rapidly; but goals such as happiness and success can always be better approached with a better ‘tool box.’

So what did I accomplish as a direct result of my participation in this second IMMOOC offering? Here’s a (most certainly) incomplete list:

  • I resumed my posts to this Considerations blog – after a year-long hiatus associated with preparation for and implementation of our move from Connecticut to Virginia.
  • I gained a better understanding of the rewards of blogging (a central focus of the IMMOOC) – including developing visions of how knowledge and skills interact to enable improved use, self-assessment of those visions through sharing with others, refining those visions via dialogue with readers of the blog, and building my Personal Learning Network.
  • I was once again reminded how valuable the information found within “Innovator’s Mindset” – much more so because it was the second reading / Consideration of it for me (as with all books of relevance and value; most have at most one of these but not both).
  • I was introduced to the power and value of live broadcasting of presentations / dialogue – such as YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.
  • I was reminded of the richness and value of Twitter chats. I regularly participate in #OklaEd, #Vachat, and #TWOTCW but understand better the value of exploring others as time permits.
  • I have gained a new thinking of my possible contributions to improved Effective Learning facilitation. I believe I do have contributions to make through my blog posts and am excited to be back adding new posts regularly. I’m also looking forward to Considering two new opportunities: writing a book as well as facilitating ongoing, online educator professional development.

So, GOOD NEWS??? Yes, for me for sure!!! And for other participants as well, from my reading their posts. AND for all others learning about IMMOOC too late to participate in this offering. (Start by reading and Considering George Couros’ book! Follow the IMMOOC facilitators on Twitter: @gcouros, @KatieMTLC, and @TaraMartinEDU. Search the #IMMOOC hashtag on Twitter. And watch for (hopefully) future offerings of the Innovator’s Mindset MOOC.)

Are Education Changes Headed in the Right Direction???

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The changes mentioned in this blog post title are innovative changes – the critical theme oh the IMMOOC 2 activity with which I’ve engaged with George Couros and many others over the past few weeks. To address the question found in the title, there are several other questions that must be addressed:

  • What is our definition of innovative?
  • What changes are we Considering?
  • Why do I believe these changes will result in innovative education?
  • How can we assess if we’re headed in the right direction?

Let’s examine each of these briefly.

What is our definition of innovative? In his book, “Innovator’s Mindset“, George Couros offers this definition of ‘innovative’: Something is innovative if its outcome(s) or result(s) are both new and better. Therefore changes to education will be innovative only if the student education is both different from previous practice and results in better learning.

What changes are we Considering? I cannot overstate how many great ideas and resulting changes have been introduced by MOOC participants; even a representative list is impossible. For this post, therefore, I will offer my personal list: (1) facilitating learning, not teaching; (2) keeping the approach student-controlled; (3) facilitating the development of four basic skills: Effective Learning, problem solving, communicating, and working in groups; (4) eliminating textbooks; (5) eliminating exams (in favor of project outcomes) ; and (6) eliminating grades in favor of course grades assigned by teachers with input from each student and their peers. It is my thesis that this list is collectively quite different from standard pedagogy. It will be appropriately Considered innovative if the student learning improves.

Why do I believe these changes will result in innovative education? Taken together, the six changes listed in the previous paragraph have the potential to put each student in control of her/his education, to develop and convert to habits skills so important to lifelong learning that is critical to success regardless of the definition of that success, to rely on the essentially limitless information gathered from social media, to utilize organization and critical thinking skills (included in my vision of the other four skills listed by the way) to assess the gathered information for usefulness and understanding, and to address meaningful assignments. As a result, this approach will provide a learning environment providing students with Dan Pink’s three elements (autonomy, mastery, and purpose). Facilitating these efforts in such an environment, I strongly believe, will result in an innovative education for all learners involved.

How can we assess if we’re headed in the right direction? Immediately, it should be apparent that there will be no testing (except for any mandated by government); there will be facilitating, not teaching with minimal if any lecturing; there will be no focus on information chosen as ‘correct’ and included in textbooks; there will be student choices of problems addressed (associated with teacher defining questions aligned with appropriate standards); and there will be no ‘right’ answers, there will be failures to learn from, and there will be development of useful answers. Facilitated properly, these changes cannot help improve education / learning with increased motivated student engagement: biased very probably – but certainly headed in the right direction. But true assessment is also easily incorporated. Suggested tools can and should include: feedback from students including use of focus groups; ‘external’ feedback on presentations / demonstrations of outcomes; use of outcomes to improve people’s lives; and the improved and ‘not-dictated’ upgrading of student procedures. To me, the last one listed has the most potential …

The featured image above as well as the image below from George Couros represent times past when the chosen sources made up of chosen content represent the approach to education not so long ago (sadly, too often in use today…). The suggested changes (and those of many other experienced educators) are critical and INNOVATIVE in my thinking at least.

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Really??? Am I Alone???

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So I find a link to this article in a Facebook post. As I am reading, I find the following passage:

“Let’s consider a classroom of a traditional teacher:

Students come into the classroom and begin to work on a worksheet. The teacher then delivers the content for that class. It might be a lecture, video, or reading from a text. Then the students do an activity with that newly learned content. Then the teacher offers more work to practice the content usually in the form of homework. Generally this is a standard day in a classroom of a traditional teacher.”

I don’t know about you but I find this description of a ‘traditional teacher’ so very troubling – first because it’s probably more often true than I would hope and, second, it is so counter to facilitating Effective Learning.

To me, with this being the ‘problem’ that the author believes artificial intelligence and virtual reality addresses better, how can this article (sadly I encountered a  second article just last week…) get published / posted? It (actually both) improve efforts that i at least should NOT be made in the first place!

Hence the title of this short blog post: Really??? Am I alone???

Ah, Yes – Less Is More – Always

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The featured picture is yet another gem from George Couros through his phenomenal Innovator’s Mindset MOOC (#IMMOOC). Five great suggestions for sure; I’ll be discussing my favorite: “3. Less is more.”

In my 29+ years as engineering faculty, I always included group / team projects that were student-centered and student-identified – addressing a driving question from me. Leading up to the introduction of the project, the students and I would Consider working in groups via development of a group contract. We also reviewed the using problem solving effectively to address the project – with emphasis on ‘effectively.’

It never ceased to amaze me as I followed the various groups’ efforts that there were always two typical approaches to their efforts (in spite of my not-so-subtle suggestions to some that they change): (a) the groups whose key focus was developing a great starting direction for their efforts; and (b) the groups whose key focus was developing a great complete design for their project.

The results or outcomes were nearly always the same: The groups looking for the direction began their development efforts quicker, thereby encountering critical requirements faster, addressing them sooner, and arriving at a useful and timely outcome. On presentation day, they had much to say – what the critical items were, how their outcome addressed the driving question, and what could be done to probably make the outcome even better. If there was a prototype to be demonstrated, it worked!!!

The groups working on a complete design were brought to essentially a crawling pace because someone in the group (often correctly by the way) identified an issue that prevented a great design. Occasionally, they identified their flawed approach in time to yield at least a somewhat useful outcome; once in a while, they actually had a design that enabled them to develop a useful and timely outcome. But most groups ended up ‘throwing something together’ at the last possible minute, sadly at times not even on the path to a useful outcome. Their presentation was not well organized, questions posed to them were unanswerable, and any prototype, if expected, was unworkable.

I’m sure you’ve identified the connection to the blog post title by now. Doing less planning and upfront organizing, getting started as quickly as the direction / first steps is identified is better – more!!! This is an important part of problem solving that we educators must facilitate in term of habit development for our students (and ourselves by the way if not habitual already). My thesis: Addressing every situation faced – including learning – as a problem to be solved yields a better outcome quickly. With more effective efforts, there are more opportunities for innovation!!!